Tuesday, April 1, 2014

Worms are Happy!

It is that time of year again and the worms are ready! If you would like to order some, just email us or you can contact City Folks Farm Shop.



Sunday, March 9, 2014

Interested in fermented Natural beverages?  Come to our class this coming Thursday and learn all about Ginger Brew and more!


Fermenting With Ginger Bugs And More
Description:
This workshop is all about ginger and the many, many ways it can be used as the starter for many other fermented fruit beverages. You will learn how to make and care for a ginger bug and how to make a ginger beer. We will demonstrate ways to flavor the ginger beer or use your bug to ferment other fruit beverages. We will also combine methods to create a Kombu-ginger brew. We will also take a quick look at Kim Chi with Kim Chi 101; a beginners approach to fermented goodness. There will be ginger beer samples as well as Kim Chi samples and recipes/guidelines for making your own.
Instructor: Jeremy Gedert
Jeremy Gedert is a native of Columbus, Ohio. A culinary graduate of Columbus State Community College, he has worked professionally in the restaurant & catering business for over 15 years. A self taught food grower and composter, Jeremy & his wife Kellie began One 20 Farm, an urban worm composting farm located in the North Linden area over 6 years ago. Jeremy & Kellie have been growing red wiggler worms and food as well as raising chickens on their humble plot of land while trying to teach others in their community the importance of food waste recycling. One of Jeremy's other endeavors is fermenting, from kefir to kombucha to hot sauce, Kim Chi and of course his great love-ginger beer! Jeremy & Kellie have a dream of creating a sustainable nearly closed loop system where they can grow real, healthy food, turn that food into value added consumer products, feed any food waste to their worms which in turn help feed more food producing plants.
Class Fee: $25
Register below, at City Folk’s Farm Shop, by calling 946-5553, or by emailing shawn@cityfolksfarmshop.com. Your registration is not complete and we cannot hold your place in the class without payment. If you cannot use paypal, you may pay over the phone by calling 614-946-5553 or by cash, check, or credit cart in the shop.
Price: $25.00
Start Time: 6:30 PM
End Time: 8:30 PM
Date: March 13, 2014
Address:

4760 N High
Columbus, OHIO
43214
Map and Directions

Monday, February 10, 2014

A Brain Wider Than The Sky (Review)

Hemicrania, migrana, migraine: "Half headed";  Sag-gig: "Sick Head"
 
Author Andrew Levy, a professor of English at Butler University and as myself, a migraine sufferer has captured my attention as well as the essence of migraine.
Levy traces the migraine through history from before the time of Christ to modern day along with all the arcane and contemporary means of coping with them.  Techniques like trepanning that make you cringe, unless you've suffered through a migraine more than two days long in which case you really start to think it may be a good idea.  Levy not only traces the migraine through its various mentions in literature & medical publications but also traces it through the influential people it has affected.  Nietzsche, Louis Carol, Ulysses S. Grant, even Elvis Presley, all migraineurs and the list goes on.  somewhat more interesting is the affect that migraines had on these famous victims, for instance, the drugs that lead to Elvis' death were likely a means of coping with this debilitating affliction, and Carol's famous Alice in Wonderland is suspected to be not just a description of but an actual migraine incarnated in the various characters and the aspects they each represent, even the Cheshire cat representative of the aura that some migrianeurs experience.
Throughout the book Levy notes the treatments sought by numerous sufferers throughout the ages and how so many treatment success stories were truly by accident, usually treatments for something completely different that patients found just happened to help with their headaches.
Something both amazing and unfortunate at the same time is that the things that trigger migraines and the things that help them are as diverse and varied as the people suffering from them, caffeine can be a savior to some and a torture to others, chocolate as well.  It seems through all Levy's research, the only constant is a sensitivity to light and pain, a pain as pure as the sunshine that we migraineurs often fear with every ounce of our being. 
One aspect of migraine that Levy captures all to well is its relationships, or more aptly, its affect on our relationships.  The introduction of the book was difficult to read for me personally as he describes the way he is forced to interact with his toddler son because of this ailment.  Anyone who has been tormented with this disability (the best way I can describe it) for very long knows that it can easily steal as much quality time with your children as can your job.  Levy also illustrates the tension and teamwork that migraine builds between he and his wife.  Tension from the fact that one team mate is forced to hide in the shadows and silence whilst the rest of the house tries to go about everyday duties with little or no help.  Teamwork as the two work together reading & researching, trying to find the triggers and treatments specific to his affliction.
The truly interesting thing that Levy brings forth, especially documenting the long list of highly accomplished people, is that migraine is inspiring, it seems to have been a driving force behind so many creative writers, and artists throughout the ages, and as Levy postulates, how many more has it crippled to the point of inaction? 
While the author mentions a long list of triggers and treatments for migraine he also makes a point to mention how experimental the whole process can be, living "monkishly" avoiding specific triggers while working through any number of medications that may or may not help or may help but have such adverse side effects that they are not worth it.  This is where I really felt his pain, in his utter frustration of trying to find help and being thwarted at every turn.  I would say for myself that this is the truly the worst part of migraine, the never knowing why or how to fix it.
Some research that Levy has come across points toward migraine being an evolutionary "left over", a physiological mechanism to help us avoid the dangers our ancestors once faced-avoiding daylight and loud noises keeps you in the cave safe from predators.  More recent discoveries may be pointing towards migraine being an early warning system for individuals prone to stroke, thus forcing them into a lifestyle that is healthier (if you avoid the big triggers) and may eventually help you prevent strokes.
The ultimate answer Levy has found is that no one knows for sure why we get them or how to get rid of them.  However, as I have also found for myself, migraine comes to define us, we become migraineurs (French makes it sound fancy), those who experience migraines frequently learn to accept them and develop a sort of symbiotic relationship with them, they give us pain but also inspiration, especially inspiration to appreciate the time we have without pain.
I would highly recommend this book to anyone who has experienced migraine for any length of time if for no other reason than to understand that you are by no means alone in your pain but also because the author does such a great job of balancing between the statistics from research and the illustration from his own experience.
 

Friday, February 7, 2014

Review: Consider the Fork


Ever since I began cooking, well cooking professionally, I have had an interest in the when and how we began cooking and eating as we do now.  Consider the Fork answers some of those questions and does so in a very engaging manner, the author doesn't string out some exhaustive and boring time lines with specific dates and so-called "major events" as the typical history class at school does.  Instead, the author simply elaborates on simple items we take for granted such as the fork, and how we as a society evolved from eating with personal knives or daggers that were carried with us everywhere to spoons and eventually to the multi pronged fork as a sort of height of sophistication (although I still prefer fingers myself).
The book covers not just the implements we use for eating but also the apparatus we use for cooking such as the large wood fired spits built into the lower areas in the a wall of castles where men would prepare food wearing little but a loin cloth due to the extreme heat, a stark contrast to the chef coat and pants and necessary rubber gloves of today.  Spits would be turned by boys because dogs became smart enough to hide when the turning equipment was brought out.  Eventually this form of roasting meats would give way to the wood burning oven then a gas range and even electric ranges (which you couldn't pay me to install in my home).  These innovations were a driving force that lead to gas lines and electric infrastructure in every home as we now have.
Consider the Fork doesn't offer any new methods that we should be trying or anything of that nature, the book simply explains how we got to where we are today in terms of cooking food which makes someone like myself both wish for the old days and a more involved and planned out method of cooking but also grateful that if I wish to roast a beast I do not need to find my son and force him to turn a spit in a hot kitchen while I tend to more involved duties.

Tuesday, January 28, 2014

Anarchy Evolution (Review)

 
Being the Bad Religion fan that I am, I had to at least check this book out as it was written by Bad Religion front man Greg Graffin, one of the first musicians to show me that Brains and Punk Rock music CAN go together.
Graffin is not only a musician but also has a PhD in zoology from Cornell University and lectures on life sciences and paleontology at UCLA.  Graffin has also been a nearly lifelong student of biological evolution, studying books on his own as a kid as well as formal education as an adult.
Anarchy Evolution spends it's pages jumping back and forth between documenting the evolution of the punk band Bad Religion and Graffin's own take on evolution vs. religion, occasionally being able to draw (lose) parallels and metaphors between the two.
I enjoyed the book over all and even through the science portions was relatively easy to read, a sort of laymen's terms explanation of the evolution vs. religion debate.  I found his references to religious people, Christianity in particular, to be rather vague generalities.  However, his observations are likely well founded especially since a great number of people claim to be Christians yet very few of them actually read the bible or adhere to its recommended practices (my words, not his).  I was quite surprised and rather pleased to read his explanation of a Naturalist that it is a philosophy or worldview and not simply someone who studies plants & animals, although that can have a very distinct impact on a Naturalist's worldview, and why someone who does not follow a religion can actually be a moral individual with a positive outlook on life.  Graffin also made a point about atheists that although I had observed it, especially in what I call "evangelical atheists", I never really could put my finger on it-atheists define themselves by something they are not, rather than something they are.  A rather dismal and negative approach to life if you ask me.
Graffin even finishes the book on a positive note, with the chapter A Meaningful Afterlife, where he explains his personal view on what that means from the perspective of someone who does not believe in another life following this one as virtually all religions do.  This chapter was refreshing as he illustrates that our imminent death with nothing to follow it is actually a great reason to live our lives as fully as we can and to make a positive impact on our friends and loved ones since those memories and the characteristics we pass on to them are the most important thing we will leave behind. 
 
 

Saturday, January 18, 2014

Fruit Hunters (Review)


I just watched this documentary last night, I couldn't pass up what is basically "Fruit Porn" as I am a hardcore fruit junkie.
Having experimented in growing a number of exotic fruit trees & plants in our home from seeds I gathered from the grocery, I was intrigued to see where some of the people featured in this film have taken their passion for the sweet stuff.
Perhaps the most surprising character in the film was Bill Pullman!  Yes, that's right, the president from the movie Independence Day and the guy from Serpent and the Rainbow is a fruitiphile.  In fact he was leading a charge near his home in Hollywood to try and dedicate a green-space as the Hollywoodland Orchard for locals to go and tend to trees and eat of their bounty.
One of the best things about this movie was to see that people are working towards being guardians of biodiversity, trying to cultivate & preserve rare or exotic varieties of fruit around the world.  One couple from Florida has even spent twenty years trying to graft a wild variety of mango onto domestic stocks (thus far to no avail) in hopes to keep from losing it-that's dedication!
This is especially a nice film to watch during our all to cold and dreary winter here as it (at least for me) lifts my spirits a bit looking at the beautiful colours of fruit and the warm climates visited in search of fruits and trees.
The biggest drawback to the film was the somewhat cheesy narration that echoed of bad educational school films from the 70's & 80's.  However, the great cinematography, the humorous characters (particularly from Papaya Tree Nursery) and the fruit itself easily made up for that.
If you're into fruit or just want something to watch that's interesting you can find it on Netflix.

Monday, January 13, 2014

Food in the New Millenium; An Inferiority Complex

As you may or may not already know, there is a lot of discussion and controversy about our food system especially here in the United States, or as I have come to affectionately call it "Merica".
Among the issues are genetically modified organisms (GMO's), the ever decreasing varieties of vegetables currently being grown, and of course the debate over nutrition.
 
It is this last point that I have recently been thinking about.  Now the common debate is more about high calorie low nutritive value "foods" such as chips, soda, fast food, processed food , etc.  I however, began thinking about nutrition in real, actual foods such as fruits & vegetables.
Here was my thought.  We seem to be facing an increasing public health problem, not simply due to eating too much of the wrong things like sugar (in various forms), fats and salt but also because we are incredibly deficient in many nutrients.  This began when my wife quoted an author saying that "we are not deficient in medications, we are deficient in nutrients".  This got my gears turning about how it is that we as a nation choose to grow the vast majority of our food.  Farmers typically rotate crops in their fields each season (most notably soybeans and corn but also real vegetables) because different vegetables need pull different nutrients from the soil and so this keeps from depleting too much, supposedly.  If the majority of vegetables grown commercially are grown "conventionally" with chemical fertilizers, it seems that the only nutrients being regularly replenished are Nitrogen, Phosphorous and Potassium, leaving a chunk of micro nutrients missing over time.  This deficiency rolls downhill into our diets terminating in compromised health and well being. 
 
A remedy for this unsustainable method of food growing is to recycle the remnants of the previous seasons plants as well as food scraps into compost that can be used to feed future vegetables.  Including some small stone particles in the compost can be a good way to add back the micro nutrients as well.  A good example of this method is vermicomposting.  Feeding plant waste and food scraps (including egg shells) to worms, they are broken down rather quickly and turned into rich dark organic matter, to facilitate this process, the worms need fine particulate sand and gravel dust to fill their gizzards which help them digest their food.  This particulate is constantly moving through the worms (literally) and in the process is digested itself, broken down into its mineral components which become readily available to plants.  Now I haven't done any scientific experiments or long term studies (although history may offer some insight) but could the results of practicing this far more sustainable growing technique be any more dangerous than splicing together genes from completely unrelated organisms?
Just a thought.